NMC Horizon Report – 2014 Higher Education Edition

The NMC Horizon Report  is a collaborative effort between the NMC and the EDUCAUSE Learning Initiative (ELI), an EDUCAUSE Program.This eleventh edition describes annual findings from the NMC Horizon Project, an ongoing research project designed to identify and describe emerging technologies likely to have an impact on learning, teaching, and creative inquiry in education.  This eleventh edition describes annual findings from the NMC Horizon Project, an ongoing research project designed to identify and describe emerging technologies likely to have an impact on learning, teaching, and creative inquiry in education. Six key trends, six significant challenges, and six emerging technologies are identified across three adoption horizons over the next one to five years, giving campus leaders and practitioners a valuable guide for strategic technology planning. The format of the report is new this year, providing these leaders with more in-depth insight into how the trends and challenges are accelerating and impeding the adoption of educational technology, along with their implications for policy, leadership and practice. View the work that produced the report at www.horizon.wiki.nmc.org.

The 2014 preview has just been released for Higher Education, which identifies the following:

Key trends accelerating Educational Technology adoption in Higher Education
Fast moving trends (those likely to create substantive change (or burn out) in one to two years)

  • Online, hybrid, and collaborative learning
  • Social media use in learning

Mid-range trends (those likely to take three to five years to create substantive change)

  • The creator society
  • Data-driven learning and assessment

Slow trends (those likely to take more than five years to create substantive change)

  • Agile approaches to change
  • Making online learning natural

Significant challenges impeding Educational Technology adoption in Higher Education
Urgent challenges (those which we both understand and know how to solve)

  • Low digital fluency of faculty
  • Relative lack of rewards for teaching

Difficult challenges (those we understand but for which solutions are elusive)

  • Competition from new models of education
  • Scaling teaching innovations

Wicked challenges (those that are complex to even define, much less address)

  • Expanding access
  • Keeping education relevant

Download the Report PDF

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